6 comments on “collective Seoul

  1. TJ writes:

    "Do we have to find someone to blame? Parents, games, guns, police, media, or whatever the hell is near any disaster, why is it we pick one and not all (or none) to blame? It's like a need to put a face or identity to the blame. This kid was just fucked-up, and the gestalt of his recipe for insanity is at once everything and nothing. In fact, because it is everything, it is nothing. We need to focus on healing, acceptance, and have everyone learn pre-emptive empathy. It is nonsense to find sense in senseless violence. Let's learn more about the victims and what they could have been, and not let the 15 minutes of each new accusation rob them of what is really their time. They have been robbed of enough."

    Amen.

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  2. TJ writes:

    I haven't watched this video, and I don't intend to unless it shows up on the news while I'm at work (which is probable). There's a appreciably loud voice in my head (Yes… I hear voices in my head) that's telling me I should not watch this video, my message to would-be mass-murderers and other pariahs wondering if their faux-political ramblings will be heard after they commit their heinous act. I know it's a free press, but I wish the media wouldn't play this video because it gives this guy a voice, and I just don't feel comfortable listening to words from a would-be killer, nor do I want to be one more person contributing to the hype and infamy this killer is getting post-mortem, something that we already know he appreciated about the Columbine killers–their "martyrdom".

    So unless I'm a bystander of a news channel that happens to bring it up while I'm present, I'm not going out of my way to add a hit count to this or any of the killer's videos, even though I acknowledge that it probably brings some kind of light to the killer's motives and what not. I'll stay voluntarily ignorant on this one, thanks.

    -TJ

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  3. TJ writes:

    Gah. In short, I don't want someone pondering a heinous act to see his murderous role-models as having been famous. It would be nice if we let this killer and his maniacal crusade against the rich/smart/beautiful/whatever-else-made-him-mad fade into historical oblivion.

    -TJ

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  4. Don't disagree with anything you said, but I still feel watching the video is a good thing. The guy is dead, and while there is some glorification for him in our watching it, it's also important to understand this person. Not trying to understand this person is what got him to this point in the first place. It's easy to dismiss him as crazy, but we should learn about where crazy comes from, and what forms it takes.

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